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Tell your landlord you want to go to the Tribunal

You should only use this form if you have a 'private residential tenancy'.

You're likely to have a private residential tenancy if you started renting from a private landlord on or after 1 December 2017. If your tenancy agreement started before 1 December 2017 you don't have a private residential tenancy.

A private landlord is a person or business who rents a home to you. You shouldn't use this notice if you rent from a local council or housing association.

Taking your landlord to the Tribunal

Your landlord needs to give you:

If they have not given you these, you can give your landlord 28 days' notice that you're going to apply to take them to the 'First-tier Tribunal for Scotland Housing and Property Chamber' (the Tribunal).

You must do this by giving them a 'Tenant's Notification to a Landlord of a Referral to the First-Tier Tribunal'.

You can fill in the 'Tenant's Notification to a Landlord of a Referral to the First-Tier Tribunal' by filling in this online form.

Once you're done, you'll need to download it and give it to your landlord.

You can view a read-only pdf version of the form on gov.scot.

How to fill in this form

You need to give:

  • your details
  • your landlord's details

You also need to make clear what your landlord has not given you and confirm whether you want to apply for a 'payment order'.

Payment orders

If your landlord fails to give you what they should have, you can apply to the Tribunal to give your landlord a payment order. If the Tribunal gives your landlord a payment order it means they'll need to pay you money. How much you'll get depends on what your landlord hasn't given you, but it can be up to the value of 6 months' rent.

If your landlord gives you what's missing before the 28 day notice period ends, you will not be able to refer your case to the Tribunal and you can't claim a payment.

The amount of notice you need to give your landlord

The law says that you need to give your landlord 28 days' notice before you apply to the Tribunal, but you might need to wait longer. It depends on whether you want to apply because:

  • you've not been given, in writing, all the terms of your tenancy
  • your landlord has changed the terms of your tenancy and not given you, in writing, terms which match these changes

It also depends on whether you send your landlord their notice by recorded delivery post, email or by hand.

We can work all this out when you fill in the form but, if you want, you can read more about the length of notice you need to give.

How much notice you need to give

The law says that you need to give your landlord 28 days' notice before you apply to the Tribunal, but you might need to wait longer. It depends on whether you want to apply because:

  • you have not been given, in writing, all the terms of your tenancy
  • your landlord has changed the terms of your tenancy and not given you, in writing, terms which match these changes

If you have not been given all the terms of your tenancy in writing

You need to give your landlord 28 days' notice.

If your landlord has changed the terms of your tenancy

Your landlord has 28 days to give you, in writing, terms which match any changes your landlord makes to your tenancy. These 28 days must pass before the 28 days' notice you need to give your landlord about the Tribunal can start.

How the notice is sent or given

You'll also need to wait longer if you send your landlord the 'Tenant's Notification to a Landlord of a Referral to the First-Tier Tribunal' by post or email.

2 extra days must be added if you send the notice by recorded delivery post or email. This is to give your landlord time to get it. If you give your landlord their notice by hand you don't need to add any extra days.

After the 28 days are over

If your landlord does not give you what's missing within the 28 days, you can apply to the Tribunal.

Property address

Enter the address manually

Tenant(s)

If someone's helping

Someone can act on a tenant's behalf if they apply to a tribunal. This person is known as the tenant's 'agent'.

Have you agreed there'll be an agent?

Agent details

Enter the address manually

Letting agent

Does a letting agent manage the property for the landlord?

Letting agent details

Enter the address manually

What's missing

You want to take your landlord to the Tribunal because they haven't given you, in writing:

Changed or new terms

After a change to your tenancy, your landlord has 28 days to give you new written terms.

Has your landlord changed something about your tenancy in the last 28 days?

Use DD/MM/YYYY format.

Payment Order

Do you want to apply for a 'payment order' from your landlord?

This means you're asking the Tribunal to order your landlord to pay you money.

Giving this notice

How are you going to give your landlord this notice?

Notice date

If you do not give this notice to your landlord by the date you enter, it won't be valid.

Use DD/MM/YYYY format.

Notice period end date

Summary

Check the details you've entered to make sure they're correct.

Your tribunal notice is ready

You need to complete the following challenge before you can download your tribunal notice.

Signing this notice

If you're sending this notice by email you can sign it without printing the notice.

You can sign a Word document by opening the document in Microsoft Word and typing your name where you need to sign.

If you're signing a PDF, you can open the PDF in Adobe Acrobat Reader DC and use Adobe's 'fill & sign' tool.

If you do not have Adobe Acrobat Reader DC you can get it as a free download. You can also read Adobe's advice about signing a PDF if you need more help.

Keep a version saved

You should keep a record of emails you send to and receive from your landlord.

Giving your landlord, or letting agent, this notice

You must give your landlord or letting agent this notice in the way agreed in your tenancy agreement.

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