Visiting Scotland after Brexit (tourism and short-term work)

Last updated: 19 July 2019

The UK may be leaving the European Union.

Brexit may have an effect on life in Scotland.

It may also have an effect on tourists visiting Scotland.

Brexit has not happened, and many of the details are not yet known or are regularly changing. This page gives the most up-to-date information, but it will be added to and changed over time, so please keep checking back for updates.

Visiting Scotland from the EU

EU citizens will be able to visit Scotland after Brexit, no matter what. Even if there's a 'no deal' situation, EU citizens will still be welcome to visit Scotland.

However, depending on whether there is a withdrawal deal or a 'no deal' situation, there may be some changes to how you enter the country and what you may need to bring with you.

Passports and visas

If the UK leaves the EU with a withdrawal deal, the entry requirements for tourists visiting from the EU will not change until 2021.

If there's a 'no deal' situation, citizens from EU or EEA countries will still be able to visit the UK without a visa, but will only be able to stay for up to 3 months.

EU citizens will still have to show a valid passport or national identity card at the border, no matter what type of Brexit happens.

The UK Government has more information on visiting the UK after Brexit.

Travel

International air, sea, road, and rail passenger services between the UK and EU countries are expected to continue after Brexit.

If there is a 'no deal' situation, your consumer rights for travelling would mainly be unchanged after Brexit.

Passengers on ferry services will continue to be protected by the EU regulation on passengers' rights, which will be brought into UK law.

Passengers on cross-border rail services will continue to be protected by the EU regulation on rail passengers' rights, which will be brought into UK law.

Travelling with pets

If the UK leaves the EU in a 'no deal' situation, the rules for taking pets from the UK to EU countries will change. UK citizens' pets may need a blood test to prove they have been vaccinated against rabies.

However, there will not be any changes to way the way pets can be brought into the UK from:

  • the EU
  • countries outside the EU

The UK Government has more information.

Driving in the UK

If you are an EU citizen who plans on driving in the UK when you visit, the rules will not change after Brexit.

However, if you are driving a car that isn't insured in the UK, you will need to get an insurance 'green card' if all of these apply:

  • your vehicle is insured in an EU or EEA country
  • the UK leaves the EU without a deal
  • the UK leaves the EU with no agreement in place on driving without a green card

The UK Government has more information.

Using mobile phones

If the UK leaves the EU with a deal and you have a SIM card issued by a mobile phone network from an EU or EEA country, you will pay the same for calls, texts and mobile data.

If there is a 'no deal' situation, how much you will pay for calls, texts and mobile data will depend on your mobile network. You may want to check with them in advance to find out what these charges will be while you're visiting the UK.

The UK Government has more information.

EU citizens working in Scotland

If the UK leaves the EU with a deal, EU citizens will not need a visa to work in the UK until at least 31 December 2020.

However, if the UK leaves the EU without a deal, the rules for EU citizens working in the UK will change. They will be able to freely enter the UK to visit, work or study for stays of up to 3 months.

Any EU citizens who want to stay in the UK for longer than 3 months will need to apply for permission and get European Temporary Leave to Remain, which will let EU citizens work without a visa for another 3 years.

EU citizens already living in Scotland should apply for settled status under the UK Government's EU Settlement Scheme. The EU citizens living in Scotland after Brexit page gives more information on how this works and how to apply.

The EU has also agreed to let UK citizens visit and work in the EU without a visa for up to 90 days.

The content on this site is correct as of today's date and is based on the information available at this time. Regular updates will be made as the Brexit process develops. In the event of a 'no deal', additional advice and information will be given on this site. Please continue to check back for updates.